The Insider

June 26, 2017 -- 5:00 AM

The week ahead features several key legislative events, with the House and Senate Armed Services Committees drafting their versions of the fiscal year 2018 defense authorization bill.

Monday

The Senate Armed Services strategic forces, seapower, airland, readiness and cybersecurity subcommittees will all hold closed mark-ups for their portions of the FY-18 defense authorization bill.

Tuesday

The Senate Armed Services emerging threats and personnel subcommittees will both hold closed mark-ups for their portions of the FY-18 defense authorization bill.

Aerovironment executives are slated to discuss the company's quarterly earnings.

The Institute of Defense and Government Advancement holds a two-day directed-energy conference.

Wednesday

The full House Armed Services Committee will mark up its FY-18 defense authorization bill.

DefenseOne hosts a panel discussion on national security supply chains.

The Center for a New American Security will hold its annual conference in Washington.

Thursday

The Association of the United States Army will host a "hot topic" conference on sustainment.

The full Senate Armed Services Committee meets to mark up the FY-18 defense authorization bill.

Friday

The full Senate Armed Services Committee will meet to mark up the authorization bill if work is not completed by Thursday.

June 25, 2017 -- 4:00 PM

(Editor's note: This story has been updated to reflect that F-35 flight operatios have resumed at MCAS Yuma, AZ.)

F-35 flight operations have resumed at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, AZ, the service announced late Friday.

In a statement, the Marine Corps said:

Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 211, an F-35B squadron with 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing based at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, resumed flight operations June 23.

Maj. Gen. Mark Wise, commanding general of 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing, made the decision to temporarily suspend VMFA-211 flight operations pending fixes to a recent ALIS software upgrade within version 2.0.2 that had presented some anomalies June 22.

The issues associated with the ALIS software update have been mitigated at MCAS Yuma.  The performance and safety of the aircraft itself was not compromised by this software update.  Reliability of equipment and safety of our personnel are among the Marine Corps' top priorities as we continue transitioning our legacy aircraft to the F-35 in the coming years.

In a separate statement, the F-35 Joint Program Office said:

The F-35 Joint Program Office (JPO) and Lockheed Martin Action Team has identified the root cause and generated the software fix to resolve the issues identified by the USMC with their F-35 MCAS Yuma based Autonomic Logistics Information System (ALIS), the management backbone for the F-35 Lightning II.

With this fix, VMAF-211 at MCAS Yuma resumed flight operations today. The JPO with LM will continue to monitor and improve ALIS performance to ensure our warfighters have the required F-35 air systems to operate safely and effectively.

Original post from June 22:

The Marine Corps has suspended all Joint Strike Fighter flight operations at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, AZ, because of concerns about the jet's logistics system.

Suspension of flights began June 22 and is "very temporary," Marine Corps spokesman Maj. Kurt Stahl told Inside Defense.

Officials want to make sure the Autonomic Logistics Information System is working properly before flights resume, he added.

“Maj. Gen. Mark Wise, Commanding General of 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing, made the decision to temporarily suspend VMFA-211 flight operations pending fixes to a recent ALIS software upgrade within version 2.0.2 that has presented some anomalies,” Stahl wrote in a statement to Inside Defense. “There is nothing wrong with the performance or safety of the aircraft itself, but it is imperative that we ensure the ground-based ALIS system is working properly before flight operations continue.”

The F-35 joint program office and Lockheed Martin have sent system engineers to help resolve the issue related to the software update, according to Stahl.

“The specific anomalies are related to maintenance codes not being reflected properly in the system,” Stahl wrote. “The F-35B is a highly capable aircraft with an excellent test and developmental safety record." 

A Marine Corps official has called ALIS the F-35 program's "true center of gravity." The logistics system has had a troubled past, but officials said it has performed well in recent service deployments.

Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman John McCain (R-AZ) is “concerned” F-35 flight operations are suspended at Yuma, according to a statement issued by his office.

“I am in close communication with the Marine Corps and the Joint Program Office as they work to identify the root cause of these issues and resolve them as quickly as possible,” he said.

Lockheed Martin released a statement saying the company was working to address the issue.

“Lockheed Martin is applying all resources available to resolve the issues associated with the ALIS software update. We are committed to working closely with our customer to address their concerns quickly,” according to company spokeswoman Kimberly Ricker Martinez.

The aricraft were still grounded as of Friday morning, according to the Marine Corps.

June 23, 2017 -- 4:59 PM

The Government Accountability Office today released its decision denying a bid protest filed by Glock Inc. over the contract award for the Army's next sidearm. 

The comptroller general's decision had been under a protective order since June 5 due to its potential inclusion of proprietary or sensitive information. As Inside Defense reported at the time:

In a statement, Ralph White, GAO's managing associate general counsel for procurement law, explained the basis of the decision: "The protester challenged the Army's interpretation of the solicitation regarding the minimum number of contract awards required by the [request for proposals]. The protester also alleged that the Army improperly evaluated its proposal. The maximum contract value, including all options, is approximately $170 million."

He continued, "GAO denied the challenge to the interpretation of the solicitation, finding that the RFP allowed the Army to make only one award, although up to three awards were permitted by the RFP's terms. GAO also denied the challenge to the Army's evaluation of Glock's proposal on the basis that any errors did not prejudice Glock in the competition."

White's statement emphasized that the GAO ruling "expresses no view as to the merits of the protester's proposal," deferring to the Army to evaluate the ability of offerors to meet its requirements.

The service on Jan. 19 awarded Sig Sauer a firm fixed-price contract with a stated maximum potential value of $580 million for the Modular Handgun System, which the Army characterized as "sufficient to procure Army requirements, other service requirements, and potential Foreign Military Sales requirements."

The full-size version of the MHS is intended to replace the Beretta M9, while the compact version would replace the M11.

One of eight unsuccessful bidders, Glock filed a protest on Feb. 24, following a debriefing on Feb. 17. Sig Sauer was able to continue its performance of the contract while the protest was pending with GAO.

Read the full decision document here.

June 23, 2017 -- 4:55 PM

The chairman and ranking member of the Senate Armed Services Committee are asking Defense Secretary Jim Mattis to look into allegations that U.S. officials were aware of torture being conducted by United Arab Emirates forces in Yemen.

In a June 22 letter to Mattis, Sens. John McCain (R-AZ) and Jack Reed (D-RI) request the defense secretary investigate allegations reported by the Associated Press that hundreds of prisoners detained in the effort to counter Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula have been tortured at the hands of Emirati and Yemeni forces.

"We request that you direct an immediate review of the facts and circumstances related to these alleged abuses, including U.S. support to the Emirati and Yemeni partner forces that were purportedly involved," the letter states. "We also request that you conduct a thorough assessment of what, if anything, U.S. forces knew about these alleged abuses or subsequently learned about them. The Senate Armed Services Committee would like to receive a briefing on your findings as soon as possible."

The AP report states senior American defense officials have acknowledged U.S. forces have been involved in interrogation of detainees in Yemen, but denied participation in or knowledge of any torture.

June 23, 2017 -- 2:04 PM

The FY-18 defense policy bill, a new Navy ship self-defense weapon and a slew of Air Force news highlight this Friday INSIDER Daily Digest.

The head of the House Armed Services Committee gave a preview of next year's defense budget:

Thornberry to mark FY-18 base defense topline at $640 billion; move ERI to base budget

House Armed Services Committee Chairman Mac Thornberry (R-TX) said Thursday that, barring a multiyear spending deal, he will approve legislation next Wednesday that would propose authorizing $640 billion in base defense spending and $65 billion in Overseas Contingency Operations funding.

The House Armed Services seapower and projection forces subcommittee singled out a new ship self-defense project:

House wants Navy plan to accelerate production of ALaMO ship-defense weapon

A House panel is signaling its interest in a promising new weapon system, asking the Navy to draft plans to accelerate production of a project begun as a secret research and development effort and adopted in the Navy budget as a stand-alone program in fiscal year 2017: the Advanced Low Cost Munition Ordnance (ALaMO), being developed by Plano, TX-based L3 Mustang Technology.

Air Force ICBM news:

Air Force completes Minuteman III drawdown to comply with New START

The Air Force removed the last intercontinental ballistic missile scheduled to be packed up from its launch facility June 2, finishing the 50-missile drawdown eight months ahead of the deadline required by the New START treaty, service spokesman Capt. Mark Graff confirmed June 22.

Navy mulls using Air Force MQ-1s after 2018 retirement

CREECH AIR FORCE BASE, NV. -- The Navy is considering a plan to recycle the Air Force's soon-to-be retired MQ-1 Predators for its own use, a Navy spokeswoman confirmed to Inside the Air Force this week.

House authorizers add provision for STRATCOM to certify GBSD launch control design

The House Armed Services strategic forces subcommittee is stepping into the Air Force's competition to build the Ground-Based Strategic Deterrent with a provision to block the engineering and manufacturing development contract award if the design includes fewer than 15 fixed launch control centers at each missile wing, unless the head of U.S. Strategic Command approves.

Formal ICBM maintenance intends to normalize sustainment for GBSD

The Air Force is about halfway through its first year of formal programmed depot maintenance on the 1960s-era intercontinental ballistic missile fleet, as the service continues its effort to replace the land-based nuclear weapons into the 2030s.

More Air Force news:

Air Force expects six-month delay to FAB-T full-rate production decision

The Air Force anticipates at least a six-month delay to next year's full-rate production decision for its Family of Advanced Beyond Line-of-Sight Terminals program, but officials say they're pleased with the progress the program is making after years of development delays.

Air Force to begin JLTV buy in FY-17 to replace humvees

The Air Force plans to start buying 226 Oshkosh Joint Light Tactical Vehicles in fiscal year 2017 to replace earlier humvees.

Missile defense news:

Authorizers want MDA to consider competition for hypersonic defense program

House authorizers want the Missile Defense Agency to consider at least two competitive designs for a system defending against hypersonic glide vehicle threats.

SM-3 Block IIA fails intercept flight test on heels of MDA production approval

The joint U.S.-Japan effort to develop a new ballistic missile interceptor suffered a setback this week when the Standard Missile-3 Block IIA failed to intercept a target during its second attempt, potentially complicating plans to transition future testing of the new weapon into the Ballistic Missile Defense System architecture.

June 23, 2017 -- 1:42 PM

The Professional Services Council is pushing back on several actions recently directed by Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney as part of his effort to streamline the executive branch.

In a June 22 letter to Mulvaney, PSC's Executive Vice President and Counsel Alan Chvotkin notes his organization "strongly supports removing outdated and unnecessary regulatory and administrative burdens" and the OMB director's initiative to "eliminate, modify or pause most of the 59 OMB documents addressed" in his June 15 memo, "Reducing Burden for Federal Agencies by Rescinding and Modifying OMB Memoranda."

"However, we have concerns with three actions covered in your memo and request that you revise these actions accordingly," Chvotkin wrote in the letter, which was provided to Inside Defense. PSC represents more than 400 government technology and professional services business, according to its website.

PSC takes issue with Mulvaney's recent direction to eliminate quarterly reporting accelerated payments to small business and small business subcontractors. While PSC agrees quarterly reporting is "onerous," Mulvaney's June 15 memo creates confusion because it only "encourages" agencies to continue the accelerated payments, according to Chvotkin's letter.

"We strongly recommend that you fully rescind all prior OMB memos on this topic and issue a new memo that provides only the policy direction to the agencies to continue to accelerate payments to small business and small business subcontractors without imposing any reporting requirement on the agencies," the letter states.

The group also notes its opposition to Mulvaney's direction to "pause" entity-level internal control reviews of the acquisition function and then integrate their assessment efforts with existing agency internal control processes and practices.

"In our view, requiring agencies to continue to perform their review of internal controls of their acquisition functions should remain an essential element of agency management, even during their internal reorganizational assessments," the letter states.

Finally, PSC criticizes Mulvaney's direction to discontinue reporting on all individual agency and cross-agency performance goals, which could be tracked during the Obama administration on performance.gov. The letter notes the quarterly progress reports associated with the goals provided "valuable insight into agency activities," such as cross-agency goals for security clearance processing.

"We strongly recommend that OMB promptly identify those current agency-specific and cross-agency goals that align with the Administration’s priorities and direct responsible parties to continue to provide quarterly updates to the performance.gov site," Chvotkin wrote. "As new goals are added, they should be promptly added to the site and reported on quarterly."

June 23, 2017 -- 11:39 AM

Some must-reads from this week's issue of Inside the Air Force:

1. The Navy is considering a plan to recycle the Air Force's soon-to-be retired MQ-1 Predators for its own use, a Navy spokeswoman confirmed to Inside the Air Force this week.

Full Story: Navy mulls using Air Force MQ-1s after 2018 retirement

2. The Air Force anticipates at least a six-month delay to next year's full-rate production decision for its Family of Advanced Beyond Line-of-Sight Terminals program, but officials say they're pleased with the progress the program is making after years of development delays.

Full Story: Air Force expects six-month delay to FAB-T full-rate production decision

3. The Air Force is about halfway through its first year of formal programmed depot maintenance on the 1960s-era intercontinental ballistic missile fleet, as the service continues its effort to replace the land-based nuclear weapons into the 2030s.

Full Story: Formal ICBM maintenance intends to normalize sustainment for GBSD

June 22, 2017 -- 12:47 PM

The defense budget topline, Navy shipbuilding and a lot more highlight this Thursday INSIDER Daily Digest.

The defense budget topline is slowly coming into view:

New defense topline budget numbers emerging from GOP committees

The rough draft of the defense topline for fiscal year 2018 is significantly higher than the figure sought by the Trump administration, though negotiations continue and a partisan budget battle remains likely, according to multiple sources inside three separate House committees.

House authorizers poised to increase FY-18 topline, while GOP budget blueprint is MIA

The House Armed Services Committee is set to authorize a defense spending increase beyond what the Trump administration has proposed for fiscal year 2018 when the committee drafts its version of the defense authorization bill next week, and will likely do so as the GOP remains mired in negotiations over a broader budgetary blueprint.

Navy shipbuilding news:

Navy, OMB in negotiations on LCS budget offset; expected to notify Congress before July 4 recess

The Navy and the Office of Management and Budget are in discussions over the budget offset for a second Littoral Combat Ship in the fiscal year 2018 budget and plan to notify Congress of their decision before the July 4 recess, multiple sources confirmed to Inside Defense.

Courtney: House subcommittee mark requests 13 ships in fiscal year 2018

The House Armed Services seapower and projection forces subcommittee mark directs the Navy to purchase 13 ships in fiscal year 2018, which disregards the service's initial request of eight vessels.

More coverage of the defense policy bill mark-up:

House wants DOD plan for space-based sensor network to track ballistic missiles and more

A House panel has proposed legislation that would require the Air Force and Missile Defense Agency to map out a plan to develop and demonstrate an operational prototype of a space-based sensor layer to provide precision tracking data of enemy ballistic missiles "at the earliest practicable opportunity."

Document: House authorizers' FY-18 strategic forces mark

Readiness subcommittee leaves BRAC proposal unaddressed

The House Armed Services readiness subcommittee's portion of the defense policy bill does not provide for a new Base Realignment and Closure round for the Defense Department, but the full committee's bill may address the issue, according to congressional aides.

Document: House authorizers' FY-18 readiness mark

'Baffled' by Compass Call, House committee floats review in defense policy mark

The House Armed Services seapower and projection forces subcommittee wants to block any progress the Air Force is making in moving EC-130H Compass Call equipment to a new aircraft until Pentagon leadership signs off on the service's acquisition strategy, following three bid protests and a program delay.

Defense business news:

Vectrus CEO seeks to bolster core work with new technology

Chuck Prow, who took over as chief executive of Vectrus late last year, plans to maintain the contractor's focus on logistics and facilities, but bolster the company's technology capabilities.

(Want more defense business news? Check out our Notification Center to receive email updates whenever a related story is posted.)

Don't expect the Air Force to re-start the F-22 production line anytime soon:

Air Force estimates additional F-22s would cost $50 billion

The Air Force estimates it would cost about $50 billion to buy 194 additional F-22s and told Congress earlier this month in a classified report it has no plans to re-start the production line.

June 22, 2017 -- 11:48 AM

Vencore said this week it has filed a registration statement for an initial public offering of its common stock.

The company was formed in 2010, when Lockheed divested its Enterprise Integration Group. That business was picked up by private-equity firm Veritas Capital for $815 million.

Vencore in 2013 acquired Applied Communication Sciences, a company whose origins trace back to Bell Laboratories, and in 2014 acquired the QinetiQ North America services and solutions group.

Vencore, which has 3,750 employees, said this week the number of shares and price range of its proposed offering haven't yet been determined.

June 22, 2017 -- 11:27 AM

The chairman of the House Armed Services strategic forces subcommittee said Thursday he is "shocked" and "pissed" at Air Force leadership's response to his subcommittee's proposed mark of fiscal year 2018 policy legislation that would direct the creation of a separate Space Corps.

The new corps would be a separate service under the leadership of the Air Force secretary and a new Space Corps chief of staff. The proposed language says the organization should be established by Jan. 1, 2019.

Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson and Chief of Staff Gen. David Goldfein told reporters June 21 the proposal would complicate the Air Force's own organizational reform efforts and would disrupt ongoing efforts to better position the service to operate in an increasingly contested space environment.

Rogers, in his opening remarks at the subcommittee's June 22 mark of the legislation, said the Air Force's response misses the point of his proposed directive.

"These changes won't be easy and will be disruptive in the short-term, but our adversaries will never be less capable than they are today," Rogers said. "I had no illusions they were going to embrace our reforms. But when I see arguments that we are actually going to set back efforts to respond to adversary space threats . . . I'm pissed."

Wilson told reporters the Air Force needs funding for "lethality, not bureaucracy."

"I don't need another chief of staff or another six deputy chiefs of staff," she said. "We need to simplify, not make it more complicated and bureaucratic."

Rogers questioned Wilson's claim that the new corps would require six additional deputy chiefs of staff.

"The secretary should tell me where in this proposal it says she needs to add six more deputy chiefs of staff," he said. "If she can't implement this proposal without creating six new deputy chiefs of staff, that's on her. Maybe we need a Space Corps secretary instead of leaving it to the secretary of the Air Force."

June 22, 2017 -- 11:18 AM

Some must-reads from this week's issue of Inside the Pentagon:

1. The House Armed Services Committee is set to authorize a defense spending increase beyond what the Trump administration has proposed for fiscal year 2018 when the committee drafts its version of the defense authorization bill next week, and will likely do so as the GOP remains mired in negotiations over a broader budgetary blueprint.

Full story: House authorizers poised to increase FY-18 topline, while GOP budget blueprint is MIA

2. The Defense Department is seeking new ways to strengthen counterintelligence capabilities, looking beyond simply spending more money to defend against "insider" threats and seeking "new approaches" to the challenge of managing massive stores of sensitive data in an age where an individual can, in one fell swoop, make off with a "staggering scale" of state secrets.

Full story: DOD advisory task force seeking 'new approaches' to CI mission

3. The House Armed Services strategic forces subcommittee is advancing legislation requiring the Pentagon to shift acquisition authority for operational missile defense systems from the Missile Defense Agency to the military departments.

Full story: House authorizers aim to shift procurement away from MDA

4. Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman John McCain (R-AZ) on Tuesday questioned the corporate ties of President Trump's deputy defense secretary nominee Patrick Shanahan, and threatened to block the former Boeing executive's nomination if he continued to "duck" questions on the threat posed by Russia.

Full story: McCain questions Shanahan's Boeing ties; threatens to block nomination

June 21, 2017 -- 6:25 PM

The Senate Armed Services Committee announced late Wednesday the nomination hearing for Richard Spencer, President Trump's pick for Navy secretary, has been postponed.

The hearing was slated for June 22 at 9:30 a.m.

According to the committee's website, the hearing will be rescheduled but a new date had not been set as of press time.

June 21, 2017 -- 4:07 PM

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said after a high-level meeting between U.S. and Chinese officials on Wednesday that both nations are not doomed to conflict and continue to share the goal of a de-nuclearized North Korea.

"Our two nations can and do cooperate in mutually beneficial ways," he said. "While competition between our nations is bound to occur, conflict is not inevitable."

Mattis said China and the United States share the same goal of a nuclear-free Korean Peninsula and had "open and frank" discussions about what more Chinese officials can do to pressure the North Korean regime to cease provocative military actions.

The defense secretary also highlighted the recent death of U.S. college student Otto Warmbier, who died shortly after he was freed from 18 months of detention in North Korea.

"We see a young man go over there healthy and with a minor act of mischief come home dead, basically," Mattis said. "There's no way we can look at a situation like this with any kind of understanding. What you're seeing I think is the American people's frustration with a regime that provokes and provokes and provokes. China continues to work these issues. China's end state on the Korean Peninsula is the same as ours."

June 21, 2017 -- 1:53 PM

The Navy's 30-year shipbuilding plan, a proposed Air Force "Space Corps" and a lot of congressional mark-up coverage highlight this Wednesday INSIDER Daily Digest.

Don't expect the Navy's 30-year shipbuilding plan to reflect plans for 355-ship fleet:

Navy will submit 30-year shipbuilding plan that does not reflect plans for 355-ship fleet

The Navy will submit a 30-year shipbuilding plan in fiscal year 2018 that does not reflect its plans for a 355-ship fleet because the budget does not support growing the force, according to a service official.

House lawmakers are proposing an Air Force 'Space Corps':

Air Force leaders say Space Corps proposal would complicate reform efforts

The Air Force chief of staff and secretary told reporters Wednesday that while they appreciate the passion behind House lawmakers' proposal to create a separate Space Corps under the service's leadership, the move would complicate and add bureaucracy to a system they are trying to reform.

House lawmakers propose new Space Corps and U.S. Space Command in FY-18 policy mark

The House Armed Services strategic forces subcommittee is proposing a significant reorganization of the military space mission in its mark of the fiscal year 2018 defense policy bill, directing the creation of a new U.S. Space Corps as well as a U.S. Space Command by January 2019.

More of our FY-18 defense policy bill mark-up coverage:

Authorizers eye end-strength increase sought by Army

House authorizers intend to support the Army in its push for an end-strength increase, according to legislation released June 20.

House panel looks to accelerate Army vehicle modernization

Lawmakers are skeptical of the Army's plans to upgrade and ultimately replace its existing combat vehicles, and plan to enshrine their concerns in legislation.

House authorizers aim to shift procurement away from MDA

The House Armed Services strategic forces subcommittee is advancing legislation requiring the Pentagon to shift acquisition authority for operational missile defense systems from the Missile Defense Agency to the military departments.

House subcommittee mark green-lights Virginia-class 13-boat block buy

The House Armed Services seapower and projection forces subcommittee mark calls for a 13-boat block buy for the Virginia-class submarine, which, if passed, would be the largest shipbuilding contract to date.

Future GMD acquisition strategy envisions three new competitions, extending legacy contract

The Missile Defense Agency intends to break up the next acquisition contract for the Ground-based Midcourse Defense program into a handful of efforts, including a competition for new interceptors as well as a competition for ground systems development and readiness -- while extending the current GMD Development and Sustainment contract held by Boeing from 2018 to 2022 for select activities.

FY-18 defense policy bill mark includes MQ-9 cost-benefit analysis

The House Armed Services tactical air and land forces subcommittee’s mark of the fiscal year 2018 defense policy bill directs the Air Force and defense secretaries to study whether it would be more cost-effective to improve the MQ-9 Reaper fleet by upgrading existing Block 1 aircraft to the Block 5 design or by buying new aircraft altogether.

House authorizers call for more oversight of F-35 EOQ strategy

Some House authorizers are proposing additional oversight of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter's economic order quantity strategy, calling for reporting requirements similar to those of a multiyear procurement deal.

Another Defense Science Board task force study is underway:

DOD advisory task force seeking 'new approaches' to counterintelligence mission

The Defense Department is seeking new ways to strengthen counterintelligence capabilities, looking beyond simply spending more money to defend against "insider" threats and seeking "new approaches" to the challenge of managing massive stores of sensitive data in an age where an individual can, in one fell swoop, make off with a "staggering scale" of state secrets.

News from this week's Inside the Army, in case you missed it:

USAREUR to cut exercises to 'no more than 50' in FY-18

As the Army expands its rotational presence in Europe to deter Russia, the service is shifting its approach to multilateral exercises on the continent.

Army Materiel Command 'pressing' for funding for cyber initiatives

Army Materiel Command is working with the Army staff to have funds allocated for its cyber initiatives, according to AMC's cyber division chief.

Vendors seeking Phase 2 awards for RS3 contract vehicle

The Army is preparing to issue further awards for a services contract vehicle worth up to $37.4 billion.

TRADOC to host second CIE, focused on Big 6+1

Army Training and Doctrine Command plans an engagement with industry this summer on its Big 6+1 capabilities.

Army releases market survey for Common Robotic System, Heavy

The Army is seeking information from industry for the Common Robotic System, Heavy according to a Federal Business Opportunities notice.

More Inside the Navy news:

Navy official: Aircraft programs should apply submarine rapid acquisition model

Navy aircraft programs should consider the submarine community as a model when thinking of how to execute rapid acquisition projects, according to a service official.

June 21, 2017 -- 11:08 AM

Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson and Chief of Staff Gen. David Goldfein are testifying this morning before Senate appropriators on the service's fiscal year 2018 budget request.

Click here to read their joint prepared testimony and here to watch the live feed.