The Insider

By Tony Bertuca
January 11, 2023 at 2:00 PM

A new commission to assess the National Defense Strategy has been named, according to a Senate Armed Services Committee announcement.

The commission will be chaired by former Rep. Jane Harman (D-CA), while Eric Edelman, a former ambassador and Pentagon policy chief who is currently a counselor at the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments, will be vice chair.

Other commissioners include retired Army four-star John “Jack” Keane, CSBA president and CEO Thomas Mahnken, Executive Vice President for Policy at the Center for American Progress Mara Rudman, Microsoft’s Mariah Sixkiller, Cloudfare Inc.’s Alissa Starzak and Roger Zakheim, the Washington director of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation and Institute.

The commission is required by Congress in the Fiscal Year 2022 National Defense Authorization Act.

Among other things, the commission is tasked with providing “an evaluation of the resources necessary to support the strategy, including budget recommendations.”

The previous NDS commission produced an influential report that eventually became the basis for GOP lawmakers seeking to annually increase defense spending between 3% and 5%.

Edelman, Keane, Mahnken and Zakheim all served on the previous commission, though Edelman was previously co-chair.

By John Liang
January 11, 2023 at 1:37 PM

This Wednesday INSIDER Daily Digest has news on whether House Republicans would stomach defense spending cuts, coverage of the Surface Navy Association's annual conference and more.

Now that House Speaker Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) is in place, information is beginning to emerge concerning what kind of deals he had to strike and what sort of promises he had to make to win a historically contentious speaker's election:

GOP's ascension to House majority drives confusion over possible defense cuts

Depending on which senior House Republican you ask, defense spending cuts are either "on the table" or "have not been discussed."

Navy 5th Fleet Commander Vice Adm. Brad Cooper spoke this week at the Surface Navy Association's annual symposium:

5th Fleet commander details 'digital ocean' concept after TF-59 reaches FOC

Over a year after its inception, the Navy's Mideast-based unmanned task force has reached full operational capability and U.S. 5th Fleet aims to expand its presence to create a "digital ocean" in the region as threats from Iran and other malign actors remain "very real."

More from SNA:

Navy targets 75 mission-capable ships as readiness 'north star'

Working to improve surface force readiness, the Navy has set a goal of keeping 75 ships designated as "mission capable" or "full mission capable" -- a north star target that will underpin all future surface force efforts, according to service leaders.

In a new twist, the Missile Defense Agency has decided not to specify the number of interceptors in the Ground-based Midcourse Defense fleet:

DOD increases size of GMD fleet; total number of operational GBIs no longer public

The Defense Department has added a small buffer to its limited inventory of intercontinental ballistic missile-killing interceptors, growing the Ground-based Midcourse Defense program by two guided missiles after harvesting enough spare parts to assemble a pair of the most modern variants of the homeland defense interceptor.

Our colleagues at Inside Cybersecurity have the latest on the Pentagon's Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification program:

Pentagon plans to formally propose changes to CMMC program ahead of official launch

Full implementation of the Pentagon's Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification program for defense contractors will likely shift to 2024 based on revised estimates from the Defense Department in the fall 2022 unified agenda, which indicates two proposed rules are expected for release in the coming months.

By Audrey Decker
January 11, 2023 at 1:14 PM

Lawmakers from the House Armed Services Committee have sent a letter to President Biden backing the tripartite AUKUS agreement after two senators voiced bipartisan concern that the security pact could harm the U.S. submarine industrial base.

A key feature of the AUKUS agreement between Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States is that Australia would be provided access to sensitive U.S. nuclear submarine propulsion technology. AUKUS members are expected to unveil the path for Australia to purchase a nuclear-powered submarine in March. The plan forward is much anticipated as Australia has no nuclear sector -- and the U.S. continues to face its own submarine industrial base challenges.

In December, Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman Jack Reed (D-RI) sent a letter with now-retired Sen. Jim Inhofe (R-OK) cautioning Biden that the AUKUS agreement is a “zero-sum game” that could stress the U.S. submarine industrial base to its “breaking point.” Reed and Inhofe’s letter was first reported by Breaking Defense.

In response to those concerns, Rep. Joe Courtney (D-CT) released a letter yesterday in support of the pact, noting AUKUS is crucial for the security of the nation and its allies in the Indo-Pacific region.

In addition to Courtney, the letter was signed by a bipartisan group of lawmakers: Reps. Mike Gallagher (R-WI), Adam Smith (D-WA), Mike Rogers (R-AL), Trent Kelly (R-MS), Donald Norcross (D-NJ), Rob Wittman (R-VA), Derek Kilmer (D-WA) and Blake Moore (R-UT). Rogers has been named chairman of the House Armed Services Committee and Gallagher chairman of the Select Committee on China.

“Far from a zero-sum game, the potential for the United States to provide or build new submarines under AUKUS, should that be the recommendation of the trilateral consultation, could very well be a ‘rising tide that lifts all boats,’” House lawmakers state.

While the COVID-19 pandemic strained the submarine industrial base, those challenges will not remain “static” in the coming decades for AUKUS, according to the letter.

The three AUKUS countries are nearing the end of an 18-month consultation period which began in the fall of 2021 with the announcement of the security pact.

“Any proposals that come from the completion of the consultation process will require and receive close congressional scrutiny, balancing out our undersea needs here at home, the strategic security goals of AUKUS and the health and future of our industrial base. We do not, however, see these as mutually exclusive aims,” the House lawmakers said in their letter.

After blowback from Reed and Inhofe’s letter, Reed took to Twitter on Jan. 9, writing that he supports AUKUS. Successful implementation of the pact will require “responsible oversight and a stable industrial base,” he said.

By Tony Bertuca
January 10, 2023 at 2:16 PM

As soon as next week, about 100 Ukrainian troops will begin training at Ft. Sill, OK, to use the Patriot air defense system, which is expected to take several months, according to the Pentagon.

The move follows a U.S. announcement in December to send one Patriot battery to Ukraine.

Brig. Gen. Pat Ryder, the Pentagon’s chief spokesman, said efforts will be made to accelerate the training but stressed it would not be shortchanged.

“These instructors will be the same instructors that already conduct training for U.S., allied and partner forces that go through Ft. Sill,” he said. “Once the training is complete, then the Patriot will be delivered so that then they can employ it. We'll continue to work as quickly as we can.”

Ryder said the training, first reported by the Washington Post, will cover not only the operation but also the maintenance of the Patriot system.

“If I give you a piece of equipment, I’m simply giving you a piece of equipment,” he said. “But if I give you the equipment and I give you the training, I now give you a capability.”

The Pentagon last week announced its largest aid package to Ukraine since the start of the Russian invasion last February, a $2.85 billion package that included 50 Bradley Fighting Vehicles, anti-tank missiles and additional ammunition.

Ryder said the United States and Ukraine would “keep the dialog open” in terms of future training for Ukrainians on U.S. soil.

“The training school for U.S. and allied forces on Patriots is at Ft. Sill already,” he said. “So, they’ll be falling in on an existing capability in order to expedite the training and, again, get the system back into Ukraine so that they can use it to defend themselves.”

By John Liang
January 10, 2023 at 1:31 PM

This Tuesday INSIDER Daily Digest has news from an interview with the head of U.S. Fleet Forces Command, contractors with "documented performance issues," the latest on the Pentagon's Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification program and more.

Inside Defense interviewed Fleet Forces Commander Adm. Daryl Caudle this week:

How the Navy's 'One Atlantic' initiative aims to deliver more presence to Europe

U.S. Fleet Forces Command is working on an initiative to "dissolve" the operational line in the Atlantic Ocean between U.S Northern Command and European Command -- allowing the Navy to deliver more capacity to NATO without having to send forces on full deployments.

Pentagon acquisition chief Bill LaPlante said analysis from the Pentagon's defense pricing and contracting team has concluded that DOD has a good record when it comes to awarding incentive fees to contractors:

DOD touts record for not rewarding contractors with 'documented performance issues'

The Defense Department, in response to concerns raised by Senate appropriators, has concluded after an "in-depth analysis" that it has not improperly awarded any incentive fees to contractors with "documented performance issues," according to a new report sent to Capitol Hill.

Document: DOD report on incentive fees, contractor performance

Our colleagues at Inside Cybersecurity have the latest on the Pentagon's Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification program:

Pentagon plans to formally propose changes to CMMC program ahead of official launch

Full implementation of the Pentagon's Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification program for defense contractors will likely shift to 2024 based on revised estimates from the Defense Department in the fall 2022 unified agenda, which indicates two proposed rules are expected for release in the coming months.

Sensors developed by Boeing and Raytheon Technologies passed critical design reviews in November, though it wasn’t clear whether Space Systems Command would move forward with prototypes from both or push down to a single vendor:

SSC picks Boeing, Raytheon to move forward with Missile Track Custody prototypes

The Space Force has selected teams from Boeing's Millennium Space Systems and Raytheon Intelligence & Space to proceed with building prototypes for the service's Missile Track Custody program, according to a Space Systems Command official.

The Navy plans to outfit each of its three DDG-1000 destroyers with hypersonic strike missiles, removing the Advanced Gun System the service planned to field on the warship:

HII solidifies sole-source contract for hypersonic weapon install on Zumwalt

Shipbuilder and defense technology company HII has been awarded an advanced planning contract to upgrade the Navy’s stealth destroyer Zumwalt (DDG-1000), which will include adding long range hypersonic missiles to the ship class.

By Audrey Decker
January 10, 2023 at 1:02 PM

The Defense Information Systems Agency is asking for industry input on writing a "strategic roadmap" for next-generation electromagnetic spectrum development.

The Defense Department is developing the EMS roadmap, according to a Jan. 4 request for information. The Senate Armed Services Committee asked for an EMS plan in a letter to Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin last summer and requested it again in the Fiscal Year 2023 National Defense Authorization Act.

Used for communications, radar and navigation, EMS will be an enabler in the Pentagon's Joint All-Domain Command and Control effort.

“The modern electromagnetic operating environment is increasingly congested, contested and constrained. This jeopardizes the U.S. military’s ability to sense, command, control, communicate, test, train, protect and project force effectively. Without the capabilities to assert spectrum superiority, the nation’s economic and national security will be exposed to undue and significant risk,” the RFI states.

The DOD is interested in “leap-ahead” spectrum-based technologies from industry that will benefit military operations as well as the entire EMS ecosystem, according to the department.

DISA outlined five goals for the DOD to focus on: “develop superior spectrum capabilities; evolve to an agile and fully integrated spectrum infrastructure; pursue total force readiness in the spectrum; secure enduring partnerships for spectrum advantage; and establish effective spectrum governance.”

The announcement added that the EMS planning process must consider the “rapid pace of emerging threats within the EMS from our near-peer adversaries including China and Russia.”

Responses from industry are due Feb. 10.

By John Liang
January 10, 2023 at 10:51 AM

Leidos has hired retired Navy Vice Adm. Frank Pandolfe to be vice president and strategic account executive for the Navy and Marine Corps.

Pandolfe will be responsible for strengthening the company's relationships with the Navy "and advancing opportunities that drive growth throughout the enterprise," according to a Leidos statement.

Before joining Leidos, Pandolfe was president of international operations for Owl Cyber Defense and Acuity International LLC in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.

Pandolfe served 37 years as a U.S. naval officer, leading Naval Striking and Support Forces NATO as well as the Navy 6th Fleet.

By Tony Bertuca
January 10, 2023 at 10:29 AM

Rep. Mike Rogers (R-AL) has been named chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, marking the first time a member of Congress from Alabama will helm the panel, according to a statement from his office.

Rogers' advancement to the chair follows two years he spent as the committee’s ranking member when Democrats held the House majority.

“I am honored to have been selected by my House Republican colleagues to serve as chairman of the House Armed Services Committee,” he said in a statement. “Our nation faces unprecedented threats from China, Russia, North Korea and Iran. In order to deter these threats and remain the most feared force in the world we must ensure that our military focuses on lethality and capability. Over the next two years, the House Armed Services Committee will provide our warfighters with the resources and weapons they need to deter and, if necessary, defeat any adversary anywhere in the world.”

Rogers also said he plans to target “misguided” Biden administration policies that serve a “social agenda.”

“Those in charge of these initiatives will come before the committee to explain how they will protect our national security,” he said. “We will leave no stone unturned in holding the Biden administration accountable.”

Meanwhile, Rogers statement comes after a contentious election for House speaker in which he had to be physically restrained after lunging toward Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL), a member of the House Armed Services Committee. Rogers later apologized.

However, the speaker’s election, which Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) ultimately won by cutting various deals with a small number of Republican holdouts, has led to concerns that the GOP will cut defense spending in the coming year.

Rogers and Rep. Kay Granger (R-TX), who is expected to chair the House Appropriations Committee, have said they will not stand for any cuts to national security spending.

By Michael Marrow
January 10, 2023 at 10:22 AM

A Virgin Orbit rocket carrying nine satellites failed yesterday evening, a setback for the company and a blow to the United Kingdom's first ever orbital launch attempt.

Mounted on a modified Boeing 747, the rocket was released from the aircraft and climbed to space but failed to reach its intended orbit, Virgin Orbit announced shortly after disclosing that an “anomaly” had occurred during flight. The rocket’s failure meant the loss of all nine satellites on board, including U.S. and U.K. government payloads.

“We have shown the U.K. is capable of launching into orbit, but the launch was not successful in reaching the required orbit,” U.K. Space Agency Director of Commercial Spaceflight Matt Archer said in the company’s release.

The LauncherOne system, as the rocket is called, previously failed in its first launch attempt in 2020 but has since achieved successful consecutive flights, the most recent being in July 2022. The rocket was intended to demonstrate resilient space launch operations as a collaboration between U.S. and U.K. defense agencies.

Two of the satellites mounted on LauncherOne were jointly developed by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory and the U.K. Ministry of Defence’s Defence Science and Technology Laboratory to “measure the ionosphere and radiation environment from multiple vantage points,” Space Systems Command stated in a Jan. 9 press release.

The cubesats, called Coordinated Ionospheric Reconstruction Cubesat Experiment (CIRCE) satellites, were procured by the Space Test Program office in partnership with the Defense Innovation Unit to support STP’s Rapid Agile Launch Initiative, the press release added. According to Virgin Orbit, the launch itself had been procured by the National Reconnaissance Office.

Two other U.K. government payloads, cubesats called Prometheus-2, were also mounted on the rocket and were designed to advance remote sensing capabilities and the development of ground systems. Another satellite was meant to be Oman’s very first orbital mission and pave the way for a future constellation, according to a manifest shared by Virgin Orbit. The other four disclosed payloads were commercial.

“While we are very proud of the many things that we successfully achieved as part of this mission, we are mindful that we failed to provide our customers with the launch service they deserve,” Virgin Orbit Chief Executive Officer Dan Hart said in the company’s release announcing the failed launch.

“We will work tirelessly to understand the nature of this failure, make corrective actions, and return to orbit as soon as we have completed a full investigation and mission assurance process,” he added.

By John Liang
January 9, 2023 at 1:36 PM

This Monday INSIDER Daily Digest has news on the Space Force's Missile Track Custody program, upgrades to the Navy's Zumwalt-class destroyers and more.

Sensors developed by Boeing and Raytheon Technologies passed critical design reviews in November, though it wasn’t clear whether Space Systems Command would move forward with prototypes from both or push down to a single vendor:

SSC picks Boeing, Raytheon to move forward with Missile Track Custody prototypes

The Space Force has selected teams from Boeing's Millennium Space Systems and Raytheon Intelligence & Space to proceed with building prototypes for the service's Missile Track Custody program, according to a Space Systems Command official.

The Navy plans to outfit each of its three DDG-1000s with hypersonic strike missiles, removing the Advanced Gun System the service planned to field on the warship:

HII solidifies sole-source contract for hypersonic weapon install on Zumwalt

Shipbuilder and defense technology company HII has been awarded an advanced planning contract to upgrade the Navy’s stealth destroyer Zumwalt (DDG-1000), which will include adding long range hypersonic missiles to the ship class.

The FY-23 omnibus spending package includes $517.9 million for Hypersonic Defense, an increase of $292.5 million above the $225.4 million the Pentagon originally required this fiscal year:

MDA, armed with a $300M boost for GPI, set to accelerate development

The Missile Defense Agency is accelerating development of a counter-hypersonic weapon after Congress injected nearly $300 million for the Glide Phase Interceptor project in fiscal year 2023, raising development spending on the Hypersonic Defense program to more than half-a-billion dollars this year following a classified independent cost assessment completed for the GPI last fall.

Connecticut lawmakers are backing Sikorsky's protest of a billion-dollar contract awarded to Textron's Bell last month:

Connecticut lawmakers are supporting bid protest to FLRAA contract

Connecticut's congressional delegation is throwing its support behind Sikorsky and Boeing's protest of the Future Long Range-Assault Aircraft contract, awarded to Textron's Bell last month.

More Army helicopter news, in case you missed it on Friday:

Army anticipates possible production of up to 120 Black Hawks between 2028 and 2033

The Army is planning for the possibility of up to 120 additional UH-60M helicopters to be produced between 2028 and 2033, according to a follow-on production sources-sought notice posted on Friday.

By Ben Dupont
January 9, 2023 at 12:07 PM

Republican senators are urging the Pentagon to reverse course on a proposed rule that would mandate detailed tracking and reporting of greenhouse gas emissions for defense contractors, which they contend would drive up costs and prioritize "environmentalism" over national security.

The proposed rule would “require those receiving more than $7.5 million in federal contracts to provide a detailed accounting of GHG emissions within one year,” Sen. John Hoeven (R-ND) said in a statement last week.

Published on Nov. 11, 2022, the proposed rule would classify every company receiving between $7.5 and $50 million in federal contracts as a “significant contractor” that must follow the guidelines. Those receiving more than $50 million would be considered major contractors and, in addition to meeting the regulation, must “set science-based targets to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions.”

In a Dec. 19, 2022 letter to Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin, all 50 GOP senators in the 117th Congress said the rule would “impose significant regulatory burdens on defense contractors,” requiring that a company “account not only for its own emissions but for emissions that occur elsewhere if they are associated with the company's activities under a defense contract.”

The letter also contends the rule would increase costs and “result in budget inefficiencies” and might lead DOD, in future contract awards, to “prioritize the reduction of GHG emissions over the best value to the warfighter.”

The proposed rule is “self-defeating,” the letter adds. “It undercuts our industrial base, drives up costs and puts environmentalism over national security. As such, it is at odds with the DOD’s mission and should be rescinded immediately.”

Lankford last year joined Hoeven and 14 other Republican senators in introducing a bill that would prevent the GHG rule from being implemented.

Public comments on the rule, which was proposed by the Defense Department, the General Services Administration and NASA, are due on Jan. 13.

By Michael Marrow
January 9, 2023 at 11:40 AM

Canada has agreed to buy a total of 88 F-35 Lightning II fighter jets, the country’s government announced Jan. 9.

The deal is worth approximately $15 billion and aircraft deliveries are expected to begin in 2026, the government’s press release said. Canada’s Lightning II fleet is expected to be fully operational between 2032 and 2034.

"Canada is our friend and a close ally. Their decision to procure almost 90 jets underscores the value of the incredible F-35 Lightning II," F-35 Program Executive Officer Lt. Gen. Mike Schmidt said in a Lockheed Martin press release.

Canada was an early investor in the F-35 program and previously announced plans to purchase the aircraft in 2010. Political opposition scuttled the original planned buy, with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau at one point saying the country did not need the fighter.

Trudeau’s government subsequently announced a competition to replace the country’s legacy F-18 aircraft in 2016 called the Future Fighter Capability Project, which narrowed the contest to Saab’s JAS 39 Gripen and Lockheed’s F-35 in December 2021. In March 2022, the Canadian government announced the Lightning II’s bid prevailed and that the country would enter into formal contract negotiations with Lockheed.

According to the Canadian government, the aircraft is expected to serve into the 2060s.

By Tony Bertuca
January 9, 2023 at 5:00 AM

Senior government officials are slated to speak about defense issues around the Washington area this week.

Tuesday

The Surface Navy Association hosts its annual symposium in Washington. The event runs through Thursday.

Wednesday

The Brookings Institute hosts a discussion with Rep. Adam Smith (D-WA), the former House Armed Services Committee chairman who is expected to become the panel’s ranking member.

Thursday

The Air Force Association hosts a discussion with NATO’s former supreme allied commander.

Friday

C4ISRNET hosts a discussion on data management for military operations.

By Tony Bertuca
January 6, 2023 at 2:34 PM

The Defense Department announced today it would be sending 50 Bradley Fighting Vehicles to Ukraine, along with other armored vehicles and weapons as part of a new $3 billion security assistance package.

The aid covers $2.85 billion in weapons transfers to be made via presidential “drawdown” authority and $225 million in foreign military financing, according to DOD.

Laura Cooper, deputy assistant secretary of defense for Russia, Ukraine and Eurasia, told reporters today the package is the largest in total value to date that the United States has committed to Ukraine.

The drawdown package includes:

• 50 M2A2 Bradleys with associated anti-tank missiles and ammunition;

• 100 M113 armored personnel carriers;

• 55 Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicles;

• 138 humvees

• 18 155 mm self-propelled howitzers and 18 ammunition support vehicles;

• 70,000 155 mm artillery rounds;

• 500 precision-guided 155 mm artillery rounds;

• 1,200 155 mm rounds of Remote Anti-Armor Mine Systems;

• 36 105 mm towed Howitzers and 95,000 105 mm artillery rounds;

• 10,000 120 mm mortar rounds;

• additional ammunition for High Mobility Artillery Rocket Systems;

• RIM-7 missiles for air defense;

• 4,000 Zuni aircraft rockets;

• approximately 2,000 anti-armor rockets;

• sniper rifles, machine guns, and ammunition for grenade launchers and small arms;

• claymore anti-personnel munitions;

• night vision devices and optics;

• spare parts and other field equipment.

The package marks the first time DOD has transferred Bradleys to Ukraine since the start of a Russian invasion last February.

“The Bradley infantry fighting vehicles and other armored vehicles and artillery systems will complement the recent commitment of combat vehicles to Ukraine by Germany and France,” the Pentagon said.

Additionally, the department said it welcomes Germany’s new commitment to provide Ukraine with one Patriot air defense battery. The United States has already committed one Patriot battery to Ukraine.

“The Biden administration will continue to encourage Allies and partners to make additional donations of air defense systems, artillery, combat vehicles, and other critical capabilities to support Ukraine in defense of its sovereignty and territorial integrity for as long as it takes,” DOD said.

The State Department, meanwhile, announced today $682 million in additional foreign military financing to “incentivize and backfill donations of military equipment to Ukraine by allies and partners,” DOD said.

The United States has committed more than $24.2 billion to Ukraine since the beginning of Russia’s invasion.

By John Liang
January 6, 2023 at 12:29 PM

This Friday INSIDER Daily Digest has news on Black Hawk helicopter production, the Pentagon's Joint Warfighting Cloud Capability program, the Defense Innovation Board and more.

We start off with some Black Hawk production news:

Army anticipates possible production of up to 120 Black Hawks between 2028 and 2033

The Army is planning for the possibility of up to 120 additional UH-60M helicopters to be produced between 2028 and 2033, according to a follow-on production sources-sought notice posted on Friday.

At the beginning of December, the Defense Department selected four companies -- Amazon Web Services, Google, Microsoft and Oracle -- for its Joint Warfighting Cloud Capability program, set to replace the single-vendor Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure cloud contract:

Implementing new cloud contract could pose challenges for DOD, experts say

After announcing four vendors will participate in a competitive task order process for an up-to-$9-billion multicloud environment, multiple hurdles could lie ahead for the Pentagon, including potential delays and the possibility of contractor protests.

Some news and documents from the recently re-established Defense Innovation Board:

Shyu establishes 'strategic investment capital' task force at Defense Innovation Board

Pentagon technology chief Heidi Shyu has established a new "strategic investment capital" task force at the Defense Innovation Board to advise the department on how to best collaborate with the private sector to bolster research and development in key areas.

Pentagon wants DIB to assist in developing S&T strategy

The Pentagon has directed its recently rechartered Defense Innovation Board to create a task force to provide advice on the development of a national defense science and technology strategy.

Document: DIB terms of reference memo for national defense S&T strategy review

Document: DIB terms of reference memo on strategic capital review

In case you missed it, our colleagues at Inside Cybersecurity had a look ahead at all the potential cyber issues for the government in 2023:

Cyber Outlook 2023

Multiple agencies are expected to act on incident reporting requirements in the new year as work to digest industry feedback continues at the Securities and Exchange Commission and Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, while changes to federal acquisition regulations from the 2021 cyber executive order are coming along with the release of the long-awaited national cyber strategy.