The Insider

By John Liang
August 9, 2022 at 1:28 PM

This Tuesday INSIDER Daily Digest has news on the Pentagon's rapid experimentation effort, Navy multiyear procurement programs, the Army's Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle program and more.

Frustrated by "the lack of detail" accompanying the Pentagon's budget for the Rapid Defense Experimentation Reserve, the Senate Appropriations Committee has recommended reducing funding for the effort to nearly $176.6 million:

Senate appropriators seek to slash funding for rapid experimentation effort

Senate appropriators want to halve spending for the Defense Department's rapid experimentation effort in fiscal year 2023, knocking the Pentagon for a lack of "defined program goals" tied to the recently launched effort that aims to bridge innovative solutions with military applications.

Document: Senate FY-23 defense appropriations chairman's mark

A new Government Accountability Office report discusses several Navy multiyear procurement programs, including the DDG-51 destroyer, V-22 tiltrotor aircraft and Virginia-class submarines:

Navy agrees with GAO that Congress should know when multiyear contracts fall short of buy plan

The Navy has agreed with government auditors to notify Congress when the service falls short of planned procurement quantities in any multiyear contract.

Document: GAO report on Navy multiyear procurement

The Army has been considering including an economic price adjustment provision for Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle prototype material:

RFP amendment introduces economic price adjustment for OMFV

The Army will allow contractors vying to provide prototypes of the Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle to apply for economic price adjustments as the country faces high inflation, according to a request for proposals amendment issued Friday.

Courtnea Johnson, the Defense Information Systems Agency's cloud infrastructure branch chief, spoke this week during an online NextGov and Defense One event:

DISA leveraging 'lessons learned' from milCloud 2.0 for Stratus migrations

The Defense Information Systems Agency is leveraging "lessons learned" from the early days of milCloud 2.0 to smooth the migration process for officials' new on-premise cloud environment as they look to bring on additional capabilities and mission partners in the near-term.

In case you missed it, we had a deep dive into how the Pentagon pays defense contractors:

DOD still wrestling with 'third rail' contract financing and impact on industry cash flow

The Pentagon is conducting a contract financing review that could alter its decades-old approach to paying defense contractors, a convoluted subject with a controversial history that the department's pricing chief has likened to a "third rail."

By Michael Marrow
August 9, 2022 at 11:53 AM

The Space Force is conducting market research to determine the best means of transitioning legacy missile warning and tracking satellites to the next generation of command-and-control systems, according to a request for information posted by Space Systems Command yesterday.

The current Space Based Infrared System constellation, whose final satellite launched last week, is slated to be replaced by Next Generation Overhead Persistent Infrared satellites that will provide better detection capabilities for emerging threats like hypersonics. The first Next Gen OPIR satellite is scheduled to launch in 2025.

In the meantime, SSC is researching strategies to migrate the SBIRS satellites to a new ground-based, command-and-control system that will eventually extend to Next Gen OPIR as well, the RFI says.

Research is underway for that modernized command-and-control system, known as Future Operationally Resilient Ground Evolution. That work will continue through at least fiscal year 2027, according to the Space Force’s FY-23 research, development, test and evaluation budget justification documents, which state that the estimated total cost of the FORGE rapid prototyping middle tier acquisition effort is $2.8 billion.

Besides the C2 segment, FORGE consists of three other initiatives: mission data processing, relay ground stations and FORGE Next Gen transition, which plans to integrate future OPIR systems with FORGE and the Enterprise Ground Services. EGS is a separate program that seeks to develop a common enterprise ground architecture for all Space Force satellites, the budget documents indicate.

According to the RFI, market research for the SBIRS migration solution is intended to inform the acquisition strategy for FORGE, reduce schedule integration risks and increase the potential pool of vendors. The posting says the solution must have the following six attributes:

  • “Utilize advanced modern software solutions.
  • “Resolve obsolescence issues.
  • “Support rapid incremental capability delivery.
  • “Increase automation/lights out operations.
  • “Reduce the overall Operations & Sustainment (O&S) costs for the FORGE C2 solution.
  • “Government-owned technical baseline, including data rights, control of key/service definitions, and oversight/insight into program management and system engineering activities.”

The RFI states the desired delivery date for the C2 transition is in 2026 and that the deadline for a response is August 31.

By Briana Reilly
August 9, 2022 at 11:32 AM

President Biden today signed into law a long-anticipated plan to boost funding for domestic semiconductor production and funnel some $2 billion toward military microelectronics.

The framework, the Pentagon’s No. 2 official has said, is key to addressing supply issues for the chips that are used in Defense Department weapon systems and that enable artificial intelligence, hypersonics, 5G and other technology areas.

“Ensuring the military’s access to secure microelectronics, and having the most advanced capabilities that the commercial sector can offer, is vital to national defense,” Deputy Defense Secretary Kathleen Hicks said in a statement last week.

The legislation, which includes tens of billions of dollars to encourage facility and equipment investments and incentives for semiconductor manufacturing such as a four-year, 25% tax credit, made its way to Biden’s desk last week after clearing the Senate on a 64-33 vote and the House by a vote of 243-187.

Called the "CHIPS and Science Act,” the measure spent the last year inching its way through Congress, lagging behind the Fiscal Year 2021 National Defense Authorization Act that created chips manufacturing and research programs that had gone unfunded.

Sujai Shivakumar, the director of the Renewing American Innovation project at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, told Inside Defense in a Monday interview that the legislation as a whole is “comprehensive” in its scope, touching on workforce issues, research, production and “the ecosystem that supports a much more robust semiconductor industry in the United States.”

Still, he acknowledged that adjustments will be required in the future, saying the plan “provides a base on which to take those initiatives forward.” He added DOD can also work to “diversify” the sources it draws from, something he said would bolster resiliency.

Forward movement could be limited by the restrictions DOD faces in its ability to shape the microelectronics market. Shivakumar noted while the Pentagon is “not a market mover in the sense that it perhaps was in decades past,” the department is “certainly moving the research agenda” in regard to specialized chips.

Pentagon officials have repeatedly touted the importance of onshoring microelectronics processing, with the supply chain currently centralized in the Asia-Pacific region. The Pentagon’s fiscal year 2023 budget request includes $3.3 billion for microelectronics technologies -- investments that Hicks previously said will focus on developing “the kinds of more high-processing and specialized chips that we need uniquely.”

By Audrey Decker
August 8, 2022 at 2:03 PM

The Pentagon's Defense Innovation Unit is searching for commercial small boats to conduct littoral and distributed maritime operations.

DIU, which aims to leverage new technologies for the U.S. military, states in a recent solicitation that the platform should be able to perform reconnaissance, sensing, tactical maneuver and logistics support.

“The ability of the prototype to demonstrate simplicity, robustness and modularity across varying conditions and settings is of strong interest, to include features that enable fast, mobile, low-signature movement and sustainment of naval expeditionary forces operating across a series of austere, temporary locations,” DIU said.

The proposed solution should align with small boat use cases in the Expeditionary Advanced Base Operations concept, integrate external autonomous platforms and demonstrate endurance ranges at or beyond 300 miles, according to the solicitation.

The platform should also maintain high speeds at or beyond 35 knots, transport approximately eight to 15 combat-loaded personnel, demonstrate maneuverability and operate with limited signature, DIU states.

While the solicitation doesn’t list a specific service intended for the platform, it states that solution use cases could include “integration with standard U.S. Marine Corps communications platforms/sensor suites.”

“The planned period of performance for both prototyping and mission concept sprints is 18-24 months,” DIU states.

The agency is considering companies that can deliver two of the proposed solutions by April 2023 and deliver additional prototypes by June 2023.

By John Liang
August 8, 2022 at 1:29 PM

This Monday INSIDER Daily Digest has news on the Pentagon's contracting processes, a new Navy hypersonic anti-surface missile and more.

We start off with a deep dive into how the Pentagon pays defense contractors:

DOD still wrestling with 'third rail' contract financing and impact on industry cash flow

The Pentagon is conducting a contract financing review that could alter its decades-old approach to paying defense contractors, a convoluted subject with a controversial history that the department's pricing chief has likened to a "third rail."

The Offensive Anti-Surface Warfare Program Increment 2 (OASuW Inc 2), also known as Hypersonic Air-Launched OASuW (HALO), has received funding support from all four congressional defense committees:

Oversight committees show support for Navy HALO effort

All four congressional defense oversight committees are recommending additional funding for a new Navy hypersonic anti-surface missile, which the service wants to start next fiscal year.

A new Government Accountability Office report -- first published in classified form in April 2022 and publicly released late last week -- reviews the Defense Department's acquisition of alternative position, navigation and timing technologies:

GAO: DOD business cases for GPS alternatives incomplete

Emerging weaponry that can disrupt position, navigation and timing services has pushed the Pentagon to field alternatives to the Global Positioning System, but the business cases for many of those efforts are incomplete, according to the Government Accountability Office.

Document: GAO report on GPS alternatives

This year's Rim of the Pacific naval exercise featured 26 nations, 38 surface ships, four submarines and more than 30 unmanned systems and 170 aircraft:

Navy wraps up RIMPAC, considers lessons learned

As tensions rise in the Indo-Pacific and the annual Rim of the Pacific exercise concludes, the commander of U.S. 3rd Fleet emphasized the importance of partnerships and maintaining the rules-based order.

The latest cyber defense news from our colleagues at Inside Cybersecurity:

'CHIPS-plus' is a step but 'considerable work' remains to meet challenges from China

Enactment of the "CHIPS-plus" law to bolster semiconductor production and U.S. technological innovation is an important step, says Mark Montgomery of the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, but more is needed on research, investment and workforce training to meet the security and economic challenges emanating from China.

By Tony Bertuca
August 8, 2022 at 1:07 PM

The United States is sending a $1 billion military aid package to Ukraine, including long-range artillery ammunition, anti-armor systems, Claymore mines, armored medical vehicles and other equipment, according to a new Pentagon announcement.

The aid, which is being sent via presidential “drawdown” authority, will be transferred from U.S. stocks.

“This authorization is the Biden administration’s eighteenth drawdown of equipment from DOD inventories for Ukraine since August 2021,” according to a statement from to acting Pentagon Press Secretary Todd Breasseale.

“It is the largest single drawdown of U.S. arms and equipment utilizing this authority, and this package provides a significant amount of additional ammunition, weapons and equipment -- the types of which the Ukrainian people are using so effectively to defend their country,” he said.

Capabilities in this package include:

- Additional ammunition for High Mobility Artillery Rocket Systems (HIMARS);

- 75,000 rounds of 155 mm artillery ammunition;

- 20 120 mm mortar systems and 20,000 rounds of 120 mm mortar ammunition;

- Munitions for National Advanced Surface-to-Air Missile Systems (NASAMS);

- 1,000 Javelin and hundreds of AT4 anti-armor systems;

- 50 armored medical treatment vehicles;

- Claymore anti-personnel munitions;

- C-4 explosives, demolition munitions, and demolition equipment;

- Medical supplies, to include first aid kits, bandages, monitors, and other equipment.

The United States has now committed approximately $9.8 billion in security assistance to Ukraine since the beginning of the Biden administration.

By Tony Bertuca
August 8, 2022 at 5:00 AM

Senior Pentagon officials are slated to speak at a key space and missile defense conference in Huntsville, AL, this week.

Monday

The Space and Missile Defense Symposium begins in Huntsville, AL, and runs through Thursday.

Defense One hosts its "Defense Cloud Landscape" event.

Tuesday

GovExec hosts its "Empowering the Next Generation of DOD Modernization" event.

Wednesday

Federal Computer Week hosts its Emerging Tech Workshop.

By John Liang
August 5, 2022 at 1:46 PM

QinetiQ's U.S. subsidiary announced today it has agreed to acquire Avantus Federal LLC from NewSpring Holdings for $590 million.

Avantus is a provider of cyber, data analytics and software development solutions to the Defense Department, intelligence community, Department of Homeland Security and other federal civilian agencies, according to a QinetiQ statement.

From June 2021 to June 2022, Avantus generated revenues of $298 million, QinetiQ said.

"This acquisition is an important step in the execution of QinetiQ's five-year ambitions to expand our presence in the U.S., the largest security and defense market in the world," Steve Wadey, group CEO of QinetiQ, said in the statement. "Avantus significantly enhances our U.S. offering and provides a strong platform from which to further grow our U.S. operations. Avantus has a track record of high growth at attractive margins and is well-positioned across priority areas for key defense and intelligence customers in the U.S. We have a high confidence plan to integrate Avantus in order to deliver our global growth strategy."

By John Liang
August 5, 2022 at 1:29 PM

This Friday INSIDER Daily Digest has news on lessons learned from the recently concluded Rim of the Pacific naval exercise, Joint All-Domain Command and Control, Army network modernization funding and more.

The annual Rim of the Pacific exercise is proof that partners and allies are committed to a free and open Indo-Pacific, according to Vice Adm. Michael Boyle:

Navy wraps up RIMPAC, considers lessons learned

As tensions rise in the Indo-Pacific and the annual Rim of the Pacific exercise concludes, the commander of U.S. 3rd Fleet emphasized the importance of partnerships and maintaining the rules-based order.

Frederick Stanley, the coalition operations and integration branch chief for the coalition interoperability division on the Joint Staff (J-6), spoke this week at an ExecutiveBiz technology forum in Falls Church, VA:

Pentagon focused on building 'a global capability' for MPE ahead of JADC2 integration

Officials working on the Pentagon's years-in-the-making effort to boost data sharing with its partners are currently focused on creating a common infrastructure to generate "a global capability" that would foster enhanced mission planning and execution, according to one leader with the Joint Staff (J-6).

The Senate Appropriations Committee isn't in sync with the other congressional committees on funding for Army network modernization:

Proposed Senate spending cuts to Army network modernization are at odds with other committees

The Senate Appropriations Committee is seeking to cut tens of millions of dollars from the Army's budget to procure new tactical radios, at-the-halt communications capabilities and satellite communication, a move that is at odds with funding levels proposed or approved by other congressional committees.

The head of the National Reconnaissance Office spoke this week during a virtual forum for the Mitchell Institute:

NRO 'working through' how it will operate during conflict, director says

With the standing up of the Space Force, reconstitution of U.S. Space Command and the rapid growth of space operations, the National Reconnaissance Office, long the leader of space acquisitions, has often found itself at the forefront of vexing issues over jurisdiction and its role in the future of space architecture.

Last but by no means least, the latest cyber defense news from our colleagues at Inside Cybersecurity:

'CHIPS-plus' is a step but 'considerable work' remains to meet challenges from China

Enactment of the "CHIPS-plus" law to bolster semiconductor production and U.S. technological innovation is an important step, says Mark Montgomery of the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, but more is needed on research, investment and workforce training to meet the security and economic challenges emanating from China.

By John Liang
August 4, 2022 at 2:13 PM

This Thursday INSIDER Daily Digest has news on a proposed munitions acquisition fund, Air Force and Navy airborne early warning aircraft and more.

We start off with coverage of Senate appropriators' disapproval of a Defense Department proposal for a new munitions acquisition fund:

Senate appropriators look to block new 'Critical Munitions Acquisition Fund'

The Senate Appropriations Committee is taking a dim view of a new Pentagon proposal to create a $500 million "Critical Munitions Acquisitions Fund" intended to help the United States surge production of key anti-tank and anti-aircraft weapons to continue to aid Ukraine and prepare for other potential crises.

Appropriators also want the Air Force to speed up its replacement of aging E-3 early warning aircraft:

Senate appropriators push for faster E-7A fielding to replace E-3 AWACS

Senate appropriators could double the budget for the Air Force's program to replace its aging E-3 Airborne Warning and Control System aircraft, according to a committee mark-up of the fiscal year 2023 defense spending bill.

Speaking of early warning, Northrop Grumman paid for reporters to visit the company's facility that builds the Navy's E-2D Advanced Hawkeye aircraft:

What's next for the E-2D? Northrop looks to sixth-gen capability

ST. AUGUSTINE, FL -- As the Navy's E-2D Advanced Hawkeye operates in the Mediterranean Sea and the Indo-Pacific, Northrop Grumman is pursuing a sixth-generation command and control capability to keep the aircraft relevant into the 2040s and beyond.

Senate appropriators also want to plus up funding for the Army's Future Vertical Lift efforts:

Senate panel proposes increase for new technologies under FVL umbrella

The Army would receive additional funding for some key programs underneath its broad effort to develop future aviation systems under a draft spending bill released by a Senate panel.

Last but by no means least, the last of the Space Force's Space Based Infrared System satellites was launched this week:

Space Force launches sixth and final SBIRS satellite

The sixth Space Based Infrared System Geosynchronous Orbit satellite launched from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, FL this morning aboard an Atlas V United Launch Alliance rocket, rounding out the current generation of missile warning and tracking satellites for the Space Force as the service looks to pivot to the next generation of threat detection.

By Tony Bertuca
August 4, 2022 at 10:33 AM

Air Force Brig. Gen. Patrick Ryder, currently the Air Force public affairs director, has been named the Defense Department's new press secretary, according to a Pentagon announcement.

Ryder succeeds John Kirby, who left DOD for a communications role at the White House National Security Council.

Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin said in a statement that Ryder “will fill a critical role, leading our efforts to provide timely, accurate information to the media, and through the media to the American people.”

“He will spend the next few weeks closing out his Air Force and Space Force responsibilities before assuming his new role later this month,” Austin continued. “He brings a wealth of experience, including joint and deployed assignments that will serve him well as he informs the media of our activities around the world. I am confident that I will benefit from his counsel, and that the American people will benefit from his ability to clearly and consistently communicate our efforts to protect the United States and its interests around the world, take care of our people, and strengthen our unrivaled alliances and partnerships.”

By John Liang
August 3, 2022 at 1:12 PM

This INSIDER Wednesday Daily Digest has news on the Air Force's Advanced Battle Management System, plus the service's Compass Call aircraft program, unmanned surface vessels operating during the annual Rim of the Pacific naval exercise and more.

A new Air Force model, the Advanced Battle Management System cross functional team lead, will create a sort of digital twin that will help the service understand how it makes decisions now and how it will make decisions in the future:

Air Force will release model for industry input on decision-making in ABMS

The Air Force is using a Model-Based System Engineering methodology to analyze its decision-making and battle management processes, and it will release a model of those processes to industry partners later this month.

The fiscal year 2023 budget request did not include any procurement funding for the Compass Call electronic warfare aircraft, but it was one of the biggest-ticket items on the Air Force's unfunded priorities list:

Senate appropriators could add four Compass Call aircraft to Air Force fleet

Senate appropriators could give the Air Force funding to procure four aircraft designed for electromagnetic warfare operations, according to a committee mark-up.

The Navy is working to make the unmanned surface vessels participating in this year's Rim of the Pacific exercise to be more reliable:

Navy fleet wants more USV payloads following RIMPAC exercise

As the Navy begins to draw key takeaways from the world's largest naval exercise this summer, the fleet wants more payloads for its unmanned surface vessels.

The Marine Corps is looking into developing a new kind of munition system:

Marine Corps reaches out to industry for new precision fires program

The Marine Corps is exploring the development of an Organic Precision Fires (OPF) Munition System with loitering, beyond-line-of-sight precision engagement capabilities, eying a possible fiscal year 2023 contract.

In case you missed it, we have a cruise missile defense story available to all:

Hicks breaks bureaucratic logjam, taps Air Force to lead homeland cruise missile defense

Deputy Defense Secretary Kathleen Hicks has assigned the Air Force responsibility for acquiring a capability to defend the homeland against cruise missiles, setting the stage for a potential multibillion-dollar project and breaking a long-running bureaucratic logjam that in recent years had the Missile Defense Agency lobbying for the role.

By Briana Reilly
August 3, 2022 at 12:38 PM

The Pentagon has launched a trio of new projects to explore 5G and future wireless technologies, including one that aims to become the military's "hub" for next-generation communications efforts, the Defense Department announced this week.

That undertaking, known as Open6G, was initiated through the Pentagon’s Innovate Beyond 5G program and seeks to “jump-start 6G systems research on open radio access networks,” according to the DOD release posted Tuesday.

Funded through a $1.77 million IB5G award, the effort is led by Northeastern University’s Kostas Research Institute in Massachusetts, in conjunction with a cooperative agreement struck through the Army Research Laboratory, per the release. Technical work will be completed at the university’s Institute for Wireless Internet of Things.

“Open6G will serve as the DOD’s hub for development, testing, and integration of trusted enhancements, supporting an industry and federal government NextG ecosystem pursuing 6G technology goals,” the release states.

Beyond Open6G, DOD announced the kick-start of two other projects: one, in partnership with Zylinium Research, focused on spectrum exchange security and scalability, and another with Nokia Bell Labs on massive multi-input, multi-output (MIMO).

The latter, which deals with exploring the scalability of massive MIMO solutions across tactical communications networks, received a $3.69 million award. A request for solutions solicitation for distributed MIMO, first posted in late April, noted that scaling through increasing the number of antennas has previously been demonstrated for terrestrial, cellular operations, but difficulties arise in military tactical networks given the nodes that reside on armored vehicles, satellites, unmanned aerial systems and dismounted soldiers.

Spectrum sharing, meanwhile, has been a focal point for DOD in recent years, with the department supporting experimentation to ensure existing 5G networks and military radars, for example, can coexist or work together on overlapping spectral bands. Such experimentation is currently happening at Hill Air Force Base, UT, though DOD has also funded a range of 5G projects across five U.S. military test sites.

Zylinium’s spectrum exchange research, which dives into the potential for leveraging “blockchain in order to provide data persistence, scalability, and robustness,” per the DOD release, is funded through a $1.64 million award.

“The DOD has a vital interest in advancing 5G-to-NextG wireless technologies and concept demonstrations,” Sumit Roy, IB5G program director, said in the release. “These efforts represent our continuing investments via public and private sector collaboration on research & development for critical Beyond 5G technology enablers necessary to realize high-performance, secure and resilient network operations for the future warfighter.”

The new projects feed into the IB5G initiative’s aims to “support ideation, design, prototyping and integration of novel” concepts and components, the MIMO solicitation, posted to the National Security Technology Accelerator website, explains. Through the program, officials are looking for “novel advances and engineered solutions” from the commercial sector that can be adopted to meet the military’s needs, according to the notice.

By John Liang
August 2, 2022 at 1:10 PM

This Tuesday INSIDER Daily Digest has news on cruise missile defense, unmanned surface vessels and more.

We start off with a cruise missile defense story available to all:

Hicks breaks bureaucratic logjam, taps Air Force to lead homeland cruise missile defense

Deputy Defense Secretary Kathleen Hicks has assigned the Air Force responsibility for acquiring a capability to defend the homeland against cruise missiles, setting the stage for a potential multibillion-dollar project and breaking a long-running bureaucratic logjam that in recent years had the Missile Defense Agency lobbying for the role.

Four unmanned surface vessels are participating in this year's Rim of the Pacific exercise to gain fleet experience:

Navy fleet wants more USV payloads following RIMPAC exercise

As the Navy begins to draw key takeaways from the world's largest naval exercise this summer, the fleet wants more payloads for its unmanned surface vessels.

The fiscal year 2023 budget request did not include any procurement funding for the Compass Call electronic warfare aircraft, but it was one of the biggest-ticket items on the Air Force's unfunded priorities list:

Senate appropriators could add four Compass Call aircraft to Air Force fleet

Senate appropriators could give the Air Force funding to procure four aircraft designed for electromagnetic warfare operations, according to a committee mark-up.

The Marine Corps is looking into developing a new kind of munition system:

Marine Corps reaches out to industry for new precision fires program

The Marine Corps is exploring the development of an Organic Precision Fires (OPF) Munition System with loitering, beyond-line-of-sight precision engagement capabilities, eying a possible fiscal year 2023 contract.

The fiscal year 2023 appropriations bill announced by the Senate Appropriations Committee would provide $1.26 billion in procurement funds for the Army to upgrade 90 Abrams tanks, a $602 million increase over the service’s request to spend $656 million to upgrade 44 tanks:

Senate appropriators want big increase for Abrams funding

A Senate committee is seeking to nearly double funding for the Army to procure upgraded Abrams tanks in fiscal year 2023, bringing the total for the upgrades closer to the levels the program received in FY-22 and tracking closely with an Army request for additional funds.

By Michael Marrow
August 2, 2022 at 10:58 AM

The Space Force is looking to retire legacy space domain awareness systems and introduce new capabilities for the 18th Space Defense Squadron at Vandenberg Space Force Base, according to a request for information posted by the service yesterday.

A total of 18 mission areas with numerous sub-capabilities are identified by the RFI as candidates for new systems, ranging from observation and space threat processing to sensor tasking and calibration.

The Space Force expects several criteria from the new software, including government purpose rights or details for how unique intellectual property would function in an open architecture environment; modern cloud technologies and methodologies; web-based user interfaces; enterprise services; a test, training and exercise capability; and integration of the new systems with existing capabilities and subsequent sustainment support.

If selected, the new software could facilitate decommissioning of systems such as the Space Defense Operations Center and Astrodynamics Support Workstation and could enhance other mission areas like cooperative and non-cooperative proliferated low earth orbit launches, the RFI states.

The service is seeking responses that can connect and contribute across existing capabilities, according to the RFI, and additional RFIs may be issued concerning other capabilities or mission imperatives.

Responses are due Aug. 16 and will be reviewed by a collection of government employees, academics and private contractors, the RFI says.