The Insider

By Marjorie Censer
November 13, 2018 at 9:28 AM

Novetta said today it has acquired Berico Technologies, which specializes in cloud engineering, data analytics and IT modernization for intelligence agencies.

Berico's customers include the Defense Intelligence Agency, the National Media Exploitation Center and the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, Novetta said.

The deal closed Nov. 7.

By Ashley Tressel
November 12, 2018 at 3:23 PM

The Army desires a team of vendors to develop sensor prototypes for Next Generation Combat Vehicles, designed to ease soldiers' cognitive load and make decisions more quickly.

"The goal of intelligent sensors is to automate operations key to engaging the enemy such as search, target detection and identification, sensor control and countermine and obstacle detection," the service notes in an Oct. 31 request for proposals.

Although each sensor will be developed individually using a common architecture, the Army wants an "intelligent sensor integrator" to ensure interoperability.

The Army expects to award other transaction agreements for prototypes in seven technology areas -- aided target detection/recognition algorithms, hostile fire detection and location with 360-degree situational awareness, pre-shot detection, augmented reality, a cross-platform pointer laser receiver, advanced commander and gunner sights and organic explosive hazard and obstacle detection.

Vendors will also receive awards for integration and testing.

The Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate in the service's Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center is overseeing the sensor prototype program on behalf of the NGCV cross-functional team, the notice states.

The directorate plans to first have the sensors integrated in a laboratory and then place them onto surrogate platforms on up to three manned and three unmanned vehicles.

By John Liang
November 12, 2018 at 2:26 PM

This Veterans Day INSIDER Daily Digest looks at the implications of a recent Air Force "Unified Platform" contract awarded to Northrop Grumman.

Northrop Grumman recently won an Air Force contract to set up a "Unified Platform" to begin the process of separating U.S. Cyber Command from the National Security Agency:

Air Force awards Northrop 'first of several' contracts to build platform key to separating CYBERCOM from NSA

The Air Force's recent award to Northrop Grumman is the "first of several" planned contracts to build out the "Unified Platform" for military cyber operations, a capability critical to eventually separating U.S. Cyber Command from the National Security Agency.

Check out Inside Defense's new Supply Chain topic page.

Featuring coverage of the Defense Department's suppliers and policies to reduce counterfeit issues, cyber attacks and other problems.

Also, we've revamped the Services Contracting page into:

Defense IT and Services

Extensive coverage of the rapidly reshaping government services industry, including information technology programs and more.

. . . And C4ISR Watch is now:

Cybersecurity & Defense Technology

The latest developments on military cybersecurity efforts, sensors, electronic warfare, intelligence and advanced technology initiatives.

Here are some stories from last week, in case you missed them:

Navy tying other transaction agreements to ANTX 2019

The Navy for the first time will have options to utilize other transaction agreements as a way to influence the technology demonstrated at its annual Advanced Naval Technology Exercise, according to a service official.

Esper: Rotational deployments to Europe satisfies current need

The Army's top civilian leader said Thursday the service's current rotation of forces across Europe is suitable for its training goals in the region and did not indicate a need for more permanent forces there, despite recent congressional interest in doing so.

By Marjorie Censer
November 12, 2018 at 9:21 AM

LMI said last week it has named retired Air Force Col. Patrick Kumashiro director of its Air Force support, “overseeing development and delivery of advanced analytics, digital services, logistics, and management advisory services to USAF clients.”

He succeeds Patrick Mahoney, who will lead LMI's support to the Office of the Secretary of Defense.

Kumashiro spent 27 years as an Air Force officer before departing in October 2016. He had served as chief of the maintenance division in the directorate of logistics at Air Force headquarters, LMI said.

Before joining LMI, he operated his own consulting firm.

By Marjorie Censer
November 12, 2018 at 8:59 AM

Constellis said last week Gordon Foster has been named its chief financial officer.

He previously served as chief financial officer of ASRC Federal and as chief financial officer for Northrop Grumman's civil division.

In his new role, “Foster will be responsible for the oversight of all financial strategy and financial operations for Constellis.”

By Justin Katz
November 12, 2018 at 8:58 AM

The Navy last week awarded Perspecta a contract modification potentially worth up to $485 million to further extend the existing Next Generation Enterprise Network contract, according to a Defense Department statement.

“This modification will add a new option period that will extend the potential ordering period by eight months from Oct. 1, 2019, through May 31, 2020,” the statement said.

The Navy awarded a contract extension to Perspecta in September. At that time, Mac Curtis, the company's chief executive, told analysts he anticipated the company would receive this contract modification.

The service is in the middle of a re-competition for NGEN, which provides the Navy-Marine Corps Intranet.

By Tony Bertuca
November 12, 2018 at 5:15 AM

Congress returns this week to hold hearings on cyber issues, while senior Pentagon officials are scheduled to speak at several events around the Washington area.

Monday

Federal holiday.

Tuesday

Under Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering Mike Griffin discusses missile defense at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

The Foundation for Defense of Democracies hosts a panel discussion on cyber-enabled economic warfare.

Wednesday

The Air Force Association hosts a breakfast with Vice Chief of Staff Gen. Stephen Wilson.

The Senate Armed Services cybersecurity subcommittee holds a hearing on the Pentagon's cyber acquisition practices featuring private-sector executives.

The House Armed Services emerging threats and capabilities subcommittee holds a hearing on interagency cyber cooperation.

The CyberSat Summit begins in Arlington, VA, and runs through Friday.

The Project on Government Oversight hosts a briefing about the “revolving door” at the Pentagon.

The Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments hosts a discussion on missile defense.

Thursday

Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Paul Selva speaks at a National Defense Industrial Association luncheon in Arlington, VA.

The DefenseOne Summit features several senior Pentagon officials.

By John Liang
November 12, 2018 at 5:10 AM

Some must-reads from this week's issue of Inside the Navy:

1. The Navy in September began conducting new inspections of its supplier base supporting the Columbia-class submarine program in response to faulty welding on missile tubes found in August, according to a Navy officer overseeing the submarine program.

Full story: Navy conducting new inspections of Columbia-class submarine vendors

2. The party flip in the House following last week's midterm elections could put the Navy's already uphill battle for a 355-ship fleet on a more difficult track.

Full story: Democratic House could create new obstacles to building larger Navy

3. The Navy will begin trade studies in fiscal year 2020 to evaluate the possibilities for a second life extension program of the Trident II D5 fleet ballistic missile, according to the service's director of strategic systems programs.

Full story: Wolfe: Trade studies for second Trident D5 LEP starting in FY-20

4. The Defense Department has directed the Navy to stand up a formal program office for the U.S. military's marquee hypersonic boost-glide project, a major milestone that caps a decade-long, $1 billion technology development effort and sets the stage for the Navy to weaponize the Conventional Prompt Strike for the submarine fleet.

Full story: DOD directs Navy to stand up new hypersonic program office

By John Liang
November 12, 2018 at 5:05 AM

Some must-reads from this week's edition of Inside the Army:

1. The Army's highest-priority acquisition program to modernize its combat vehicle fleet is off to a delayed start, as the service is taking more time than originally planned to refine requirements and request proposals for a future Bradley replacement.

Full story: Army lags on Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle development

2. The Army is launching a Long-Range Hypersonic Weapon program to develop a capability to punch through contested, anti-access environments -- a big-ticket acquisition project that will re-purpose a Navy hypersonic booster being developed by Lockheed Martin for use on a road-mobile system, giving ground forces a conventionally armed strategic system for the opening salvos of a major fight.

Full story: Army to re-purpose Navy booster for road-mobile, hypersonic weapon

3. The Army's top civilian leader said Nov. 8 the service's current rotation of forces across Europe is suitable for its training goals in the region and did not indicate a need for more permanent forces there, despite recent congressional interest in doing so.

Full story: Esper: Rotational deployments to Europe satisfies current need

4. The Army's newly announced radar "sense-off" in New Mexico will be open to all interested vendors, marking a significant change of plans that effectively opens up a second competitive track in tandem with the Lower Tier Air and Missile Defense Sensor program of record while jettisoning the requirement for 360-degree detection, according to service officials.

Full story: Army scraps 360-degree detection LTAMDS requirement, opens competition to all

By John Liang
November 9, 2018 at 1:50 PM

This Friday INSIDER Daily Digest has news on the Navy's nascent use of other transaction authority, Army Secretary Mark Esper speaking at the American Enterprise Institute and more.

Other transaction authority will see increased use by the Navy:

Navy tying other transaction agreements to ANTX 2019

The Navy for the first time will have options to utilize other transaction agreements as a way to influence the technology demonstrated at its annual Advanced Naval Technology Exercise, according to a service official.

Army Secretary Mark Esper spoke this week at the American Enterprise Institute:

Esper: Rotational deployments to Europe satisfies current need

The Army's top civilian leader said Thursday the service's current rotation of forces across Europe is suitable for its training goals in the region and did not indicate a need for more permanent forces there, despite recent congressional interest in doing so.

Esper: Army pushing to get long-range fires, EW capability back in force

Army Secretary Mark Esper said Thursday he is focused on putting key capabilities that have been lost during years of counterinsurgency operations back in the force, as well as adding new ones.

The Air Force seeks "best-of-breed" tools to enable the Distributed Common Ground System to process more types of intelligence data collected from airborne, satellite and open sources:

Air Force to vet potential DCGS upgrades through 'TechFests'

Four months after the Air Force's new Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Flight Plan charted a fresh path for data-collection practices, the service now says it will hold "TechFests" where vendors can demonstrate innovative software.

The Army gave an update to industry this week on its plan to release a final request for proposals for the Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle:

Army lags on first phase of OMFV development

The Army's highest-priority acquisition program to modernize its combat vehicle fleet is off to a delayed start, as the service is taking more time than originally planned to refine requirements and request proposals for a future Bradley replacement.

Rear Adm. Doug Perry told attendees at the Naval Submarine League's annual conference the service's 2nd fleet would reach final operational capability in roughly one year:

Navy official: U.S. 2nd Fleet to reach IOC in spring 2019

The Navy's recently re-established 2nd Fleet will reach initial operational capability next spring, according to the director of joint and fleet operations for U.S. Fleet Forces Command.

By Maximilian Kwiatkowski
November 9, 2018 at 12:04 PM

The Army is starting to review proposals for non-developmental unmanned aircraft systems to demonstrate as part of its Future Vertical Lift effort.

Interested vendors are competing for the service's Future Tactical Unmanned Aircraft System program, a new start in fiscal year 2019.

The contractors will have one year after the award date to provide fully operational aircraft that will ultimately go to Army Forces Command brigade combat teams, according to a performance work statement the Army released in September. The service intends to award multiple indefinite-delivery, indefinite quantity contracts for the effort.

FTUAS is to be used by BCTs for reconnaissance, surveillance and targeting assistance.

The system must be able to provide these capabilities 24 hours a day for at least the first four days of operation.

To ensure it is rapidly deployable in the field, the Army also requires the UAS to be operated and transported off the back of a humvee by only four soldiers.

The system will not carry any weapons but will instead be outfitted with a laser illuminator or pointing device that can be seen while wearing night vision goggles.

By Tony Bertuca
November 9, 2018 at 11:14 AM

Pentagon Chief Management Officer Jay Gibson has resigned, according to a Defense Department spokesman.

"On Monday, Nov. 5, Department of Defense Chief Management Officer John H. Gibson II submitted his resignation, effective November 30th," according to a statement from DOD spokesman Lt. Col. Joe Buccino.

Gibson’s resignation follows weeks of speculation he would leave after a report in The Wall Street Journal said he had been fired by Defense Secretary Jim Mattis for failing to perform.

Gibson’s primary effort at DOD involved finding $46 billion in efficiencies over five years. The Government Accountability Office has noted, however, that DOD has yet to demonstrate any savings.

Meanwhile, Lisa Hershman, the deputy chief management officer, will become acting CMO on Dec. 1.

"Mr. Gibson's groundbreaking work as the first-ever DOD Chief Management Officer set conditions for the department's reform initiatives," Buccino said. "His efforts to streamline processes, establish the department's Reform Management Group, and identify significant savings across the department will pay dividends in FY-19."

By Ashley Tressel
November 9, 2018 at 10:55 AM

The Army is seeking industry input on positioning, navigation and timing capabilities in all domains for assessments to be done by the assured PNT cross-functional team.

The service released a request for information this week asking industry to provide these technologies at their own cost to help inform requirements and/or acquisition strategy.

The CFT desires commercial off-the-shelf or non-developmental items in the ground, air, cyber or space domains that would provide situational awareness, as well as defensive and offensive capabilities, for "navigation warfare" missions.

By John Liang
November 9, 2018 at 10:09 AM

President Trump has appointed four people to be members of the new National Commission on Military Aviation Safety.

The commission, established by the Fiscal Year 2019 National Defense Authorization Act, is intended to investigate the causes of recent high-profile aviation mishaps.

Trump appointed Scott Donnelly, Joseph Hagin, Richard Healing and Dabney Kern. Donnelly is chairman, president and CEO of Textron. Hagin is the White House deputy chief of staff for operations. Healing is CEO and president of Air Safety Engineering, LLC and a former National Transportation Safety Board member. Kern is senior vice president for corporate homeland and national defense at CACI and a former director of the White House Military Office during the George W. Bush administration.

Earlier this week, House Armed Services Committee Chairman Mac Thornberry (R-TX) and Ranking Member Adam Smith (D-WA) made their own appointments to the commission: Thornberry appointing former Texas congressman Pete Geren (D), and Smith naming retired Air Force Gen. Raymond Johns.

Under the NDAA, the Armed Services Committee chairman and ranking member are allowed to appoint one commissioner each, while the president may appoint four.

By John Liang
November 9, 2018 at 5:00 AM

Some must-reads from this week's issue of Inside the Air Force:

1. Funding delays dating back to the start of fiscal year 2018 have slowed the time line for a key Air Force assessment of cyber vulnerabilities in its major weapon systems from 2018 to 2020, a service spokeswoman confirmed to Inside Defense this week.

Full story: Budget constraints delay Air Force's cybersecurity review of legacy systems

2. Intercontinental ballistic missile bases in Montana, North Dakota and Wyoming will receive new MH-139 helicopters from fiscal year 2021 through FY-27, as the Air Force looks for ways to mature the fleet faster.

Full story: USAF projects swapping ICBM base Hueys for MH-139s will take eight years

3. As Pentagon officials reckon with a potential requirement for additional strategic airlift to execute the new National Defense Strategy, a blueprint for action was mapped out in policy reviews to support capping C-17 production in 2015, including a potential $7 billion tab to restart the C-17 line, upgrading C-5s in the bone yard to grow the fleet and increased reliance on civilian cargo haulers.

Full story: As USAF contemplates strategic airlift, options for more capacity are bleak

4. As the Air Force's multibillion-dollar nuclear modernization programs forge ahead, Democrats are expected to use their new majority in the House to renew the debate over which types of nuclear weapons the United States should own and how to fund their upgrades.

Full story: Nuke programs could face renewed scrutiny in Democrat-controlled House